A Cucurbita Journey of 14 Months

This morning I made pumpkin muffins.  There’s a story here that spans a year+ in time.

The original green pumpkin, 2012

The original green pumpkin, 2012, and Maggie at the front door.

First I saved seed from a cool looking grey-green pumpkin I got at the Farmers Market last October, 2012.  It was a squatty, heavily ridged, a “Cinderella’s coach” shaped pumpkin.  Quite enchanting!

I planted the seeds in spring/summer 2013 and watched them grow.  My intention was to have home grown pumpkins to put by the doorstep in the fall.

The leaves were huge & the 2 vines were about 15 feet long toward the end of the growing season.  The blossoms looks like any squash blossom – large, yellow and attractive to bees.  I only had two nice-sized pumpkins by October, but then I really didn’t need any more than that.  It was fun to watch them grow.

Early July.  The green pumpkin vine is at far right.  At left are the mini orange pumpkin vines.  Front and center, tomatoes & French melons.

Early July. The green pumpkin vine is at far right. At left are the mini orange pumpkin vines. Front and center, tomatoes & French melons.

I did use the pumpkins for fall decoration.

Then last week, after they’d spent time outdoors in the freezing cold, I thought I’d better take the seeds out and pitch the rest in the compost pile.  But when I cut one in half, it smelled and tasted so fine, I decided to cook some.  I peeled & cut it in chunks. The flesh was firm, sweet, and a beautiful orange color.  I saved the seeds for the squirrels, and a few seeds to plant next year.  The remainder went in the compost pile, as originally planned.

I sorta made it up as I went along, hoping for the best.  I’ve heard that the puree you make at home is never like what Libby’s sells in a can, but I found that untrue.  Mine turned out that thick consistency, the same color, fragrance, & taste.  I pureed the chunks by cooking in a pan, atop the stove, with a bit of water, a couple tsp. of sugar, and cinnamon & nutmeg.  It took a while to cook it down til it was almost a paste (like canned pumpkin). Placed it in fridge til I decided what to make with it.

Last night I scoured the internet for a good-for-you pumpkin bread recipe.  Found one at FineCooking.com (olive oil pumpkin bread, using honey, whole wheat flour, and olive oil).

Bright and early this morning I whipped up the batter, using my home grown pumpkin puree.  I felt like an old-fashioned country girl, and very “with it” chick, all at the same time as I pulled the recipe up on my Kindle Fire & parked it on the kitchen counter.  I impulsively added finely chopped pecans and fresh blueberries, too, which was a good decision, and a tablespoon of ground flax seed (which goes in any of my baked goods).  And I made a dozen muffins instead of a loaf of bread.  I ate the first one, fresh and hot with melting butter (so much for healthy)  – but, oh my how scrumptious!!

Muffins from home grown pumpkins, sweet, moist, & delicious.

Muffins, sweet, moist, & delicious, made from my home grown pumpkins.

I have more puree in the freezer.  Next time I’m going to make the recipe with dark chocolate chips, because dark chocolate is good for you!

A pumpkin adventure from start to finish, Oct 2012 til this morning.  And a journey I’m glad I took.  I’m only sorry that I didn’t take more pix to document the entire year.  I didn’t know it was going to be a story.  Maybe next year…

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5 thoughts on “A Cucurbita Journey of 14 Months

  1. Perhaps Maggie is waiting for the (mouse) coachman? Next year, plant some blue flowers among your pumpkins and see if you achieve better fruit set. Bees are attracted to blue, especially borage and African blue basil. It’s quite a contrast to see all the leafy green and think of the snow you’ve had in the last weeks. The muffins look mighty good!

  2. Missed this post earlier in all the rush to get ready for Christmas. I love the pumpkin bread (I mean muffin) story. That’s why I love to garden. It’s fun to grow and fun to cook and wonderful to eat everything grown! I, too, have my electronic device (school iPad) in the kitchen when I am home and often look for recipes on it. Of course, I always modify them according what I have, etc. My latest venture was sweet potato cookies. (Still using those sweet potatoes!)

  3. This sounds like an interesting recipe, I never know what to do with all the pumpkins I grow.
    You gave the seeds to the squirrels? You are obviously on better terms with them than I am with mine.
    Nice to come across your blog. Chloris

    • Hi Chloris, thanks for stopping by.
      I’ve given up fighting the squirrels. I broadcast handfuls of black oil sunflower seeds all over my front lawn. While this doesn’t keep them out of the birdfeeders, it distracts them for a good while. It takes them a good bit of time to “get there” and so the birds have a chance to feed at the feeders first. It’s been a surprisingly successful ploy 🙂

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